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Tree roots don’t like wet feet

Tree roots in pipes don’t like to be in water all the time.
Fine tree roots grow through the top of the pipe joints and then down into the water flow.
In permanently water charged ground, tree roots rarely appear in the sewer because they don’t like to be continually immersed in water.

Pipe joints create opportunity

Clay sewer pipes are a great opportunity for tree roots to get in your pipe line.
These pipes are usually 2-3 foot or 600-900mm long.

So, in a 100 foot (30 metre) pipeline, there could be up to 50 individual pipes and bends and junctions.
That means there are at least 50 pipe joints for a tree to get its roots into your sewer pipes.
It helps explain why you can have multiple blockages in your pipes.
And why fixing where the roots are getting in today doesn’t mean the tree roots wont get in a few pipe joints along.
Vaporooter should treat every joint in the pipe line.

Tree roots in drains start out small

Do you know how small tree roots are when they enter your sewer drains?
Believe it or not, when tree roots enter your drains through small cracks in the pipe joints, they are finer than the hairs on your head or the purest Australian wool.
Then, once they are in the cracks and pipe joints they multiply

How tree roots get into pipes #3


Tree roots grow into cracks in the joints in sewer pipes that may have been there even before the pipes were used.

Hard to believe but envisage this.

Your friendly plumber has dug a trench, laid the new earthenware pipes, cemented all the joints, then proceeded to back fill the trench.

The very process of backfilling the trench is enough to put pressure and fine cracks in the cement joints.

That is just enough to let the tree roots know that warm condensation is nearby.

How tree roots get into pipes #2

In my last post I described how tree roots can easily travel through the soil loosened by excavation for your pipe installation.

Do you know why tree roots grow in sewer pipes from the top of the pipe joints?

Condensation is formed when we run water from our water pipes, through our drains.

Especially when we have a hot shower, wash our clothes or dishes in hot or warm water.
When the warm water enters the drains buried in the cold earth, condensation is formed, and it gathers on the inside top of our sewer pipes and drains.

The tree roots moving through our already loosened soils can now move along the top of the pipelines and are attracted to the warmth and moisture inside.
All they need now is a way into the pipe.

This 1.58sec clip shows how.

How tree roots get into pipes #1

Tree roots grow through trenches dug for plumbing pipes.

When plumbers excavate a trench in virgin soil to lay our pipelines to take the waste water from your home, we till the soil.

That’s right, the simple method of excavating the soil with a shovel or even a mechanical excavator like a backhoe actually breaks up the soil.

After we complete our excavations and lay the pipes in the trenches, we back fill the trench, putting the excavated soils back.

Sometimes we water in the soil and quite often use a compactor to help with the back fill process.

Some pipe line excavations are back filled with an aggregate like blue metal gravel.

Even so, the backfilled soil is never as compact as virgin soil.

That provides the roots of nearby trees a much easier path to “wander” along in their search for water and nutrients.

Tree roots chase liquid gold in drains

Did you know tree roots chase the liquid fertiliser in sewer drains?
That’s because the waste water running through your pipes is a constant source of moisture and nutrients.
In our dry continent a sewer pipe is an easy target for a tree root system that plays the long game.

Most of us use our plumbing every day.
When we brush our teeth, wash the dishes and of course shower and flush our toilets, we send the waste water off to the sewerage treatment works.
We are also sending liquid fertiliser along the pipes for our trees to feast upon.

That waste water usually runs along the bottom 1/3 of the pipe.
More on that later….

Questions about Vaporooter?

No matter where you are in Australia, if you have a blocked drain caused by tree roots and you want to discuss your particular blocked drain situation, please ring and ask me on 1800 637 600

Every situation with tree roots in sewer pipes is different!

If you know that tree roots are causing your blocked sewer pipes but you’re not sure Vaporooter will work in your situation, I want you to ring and ask me personally.

As a regular reader of this blog you already know there are several ways to Stop Tree Roots in Drains

Root cutting: Makes the roots grow back Thicker and Stronger!

Pipe excavation: Damages gardens, lawns and footpaths. It is messy and can be very expensive!

Pipe relining: Its expensive!

Vaporooter will do what all these processes will do …..at a fraction of the cost!

Stop Tree Roots in Pipes. Client Testimonial

Just in via email…..

Dear Dave and Leigh,
Thank you for doing the Vaporooter treatment this morning, it gives me considerable peace of mind.

As you will recall we had experienced some nasty sewer blockages previously, up to two a year due to an invasive ficus vine spreading its tree roots into our pipes.
The sewer line passes under a slab floor and access to the pipes is virtually impossible without major invasive works, Vaporooter seemed like a good option.

Once the blockage had been thoroughly cleared, you applied the treatment.
Today’s was the third annual re-treatment and I am happy to tell you that we have had no trouble whatsoever with the drains.

The treatment has been successful and has avoided a costly and invasive repair job.

Thanks, Stephen
Kingsford 2032 Sydney
Clean surf compressed 1

How can tree roots destroy pipes?

Tree root cells, which can be microscopic in their first stages of development, look for warmth and humidity so that they can mature.

In their search, they are attracted to and discover drain lines, which they can penetrate through extremely small openings in the pipe joints and gradually grow inside them.

As the tree roots mature inside the pipes, they create blockages when waste water is flushed through them.

Now, one of the least efficient methods of unblocking the pipes is cutting the roots, this “pruning” action actually leads to a more vigorous tree root regrowth.

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