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Vaporooter – There are some setup costs


G’day! Its Dave Conroy. I’m here today to talk about Vaporooter.

There are some set-up costs if you are considering putting Vaporooter down your sewer pipes if you’ve got repeat blockages caused by tree roots.

The setup costs are a one off thing and, what they include is putting a drain camera through your pipes to survey exactly what is going on inside your pipes to determine if your pipes are actually suitable for a Vaporooter application. 9/10 times they are!

Now, the most common question people ask me is “Does the product work?” Yes, It does!

We’re actually applying Vaporooter at this property in Vaucluse in Sydney’s eastern suburbs this morning. This is a client who has had it applied for five years in a row.

So, to sumarise:

Yes, there some setup costs.
Yes, It does work.
Yes, you need to have it applied annually.

If you’ve got any questions, through Vaporooter Australia, please contact me on 1800 637 600
Or go to our website: VaporooterAustralia.com.au

Vaporooter or pipe re-lining – A cost comparison

Hello, its Dave Conroy here and I’m here to talk about my favourite subject, stopping tree roots in sewer pipes.
And in particular with Vaporooter!

Now, one of the most common questions that is asked of me is “Should I re-line my pipes or Should I use Vaporooter?”

Simply put, relining is a great process in the right place. To re-line a single metre, one metre of pipeline here in Sydney will cost you about one thousand dollars. For that amount of money, you could treat a 30 metre section of pipeline! So, economically, Vaporooter is a great option.

To reline 30 metres it’s about 30 grand.

To treat 30 metres with Vaporooter will cost you about $1000.00. It will keep tree roots away and give you an opportunity to work out what to do with your pipes in the long term.

If you have any questions about whether you should re-line or apply Vaporooter to your home,
Call me on 1800 637 600 or go to www.VaporooterAustralia.com.au

Blocked Drain Solutions

STOP TREE ROOTS IN PIPES

  1. Substantial damage can be caused to your sewer system by the invasion of tree roots into the drain pipes which have been cracked as a result of natural settling, age or wear.  Trees are good at finding water and their roots can travel a hundred feet to get to the nourishment they need.
  2. Tree roots in your sewer line can be a constant problem that you can do without.  Blocked drains can be one of the most frustrating and inconvenient, not to mention one of the most costly problems you can have at your home.  So it is important to remove tree roots from sewer lines to ensure the free flow of liquids through your sewer system.
  3. You have to understand the tree’s root system, how it grows, before you start cutting tree roots.  That way you can significantly reduce the harm to the tree, and possibly to you and your property.
  4. Be aware that by cutting the roots the tree will react by producing a large number of smaller roots. This means the tree roots grow back and may cause future issues.
  5. Drains when clogged, tend to be the most difficult problem of all the household emergencies.  There is often no warning before a blocked drain occurs and you are faced with a stinky home, flooded floors and power knocked out as a result.
  6. No matter how stressed you are or how chaotic things have become, a blocked pipe isn’t a disaster; it’s simply just another problem that needs fixing!  The first thing is try to locate the problem and then you can decide whether it’s fixable or whether you’ll need to call in a professional.
  7. Underground sewer pipes are prone to attack by tree roots.  The small roots work their way through the pipe connections and, if given sufficient time, they will effectively clog the system.  Cleaning a sewer pipe is an unpleasant task at best, and if you continue to experience a clogged sewer pipe you need to take the necessary steps to have the problem dealt with.
  8. Proper drain cleaning for sewer pipes that have tree root problems is not, luckily, a very difficult job using today’s plumbing technology to remove roots in pipe.  You can call in a professional to handle the situation for you.
  9. The main cause of sewer backups is the invasive nature of tree roots.  Seen as ‘An Unseen Predator’ these tree roots will penetrate not only soil, but sewer pipes as well. You therefore have to look into methods of safe tree root removal that will stop roots re-entering your pipes and will save yourself the expense of having to keep clearing and maintaining them.
  10. There are some products that you can use which claim to kill tree roots in sewage lines, but they quite often don’t take care of the problem adequately and you wind up with worse problems that before.  Therefore you will need to seek professional guidance for finding an environmentally safe process for removal that will do the job for you.

Tree roots don’t like wet feet

Even though tree roots get into pipes seeking water, they don’t like to be in the water all the time.

Excavated soil allows the fine tree roots to move along the top of and into the pipe joints and then down into the water flow.

In permanently water charged ground, tree roots rarely appear in the sewer because they don’t like to be continually immersed in water.

Tree roots enter pipes through the joints

Clay sewer pipes provide a great opportunity for tree roots to get into your pipeline.

These pipes are usually 2-3 foot or 600-900mm long and there could be up to 50 individual pipes, bends and junctions in a 30 metre (100ft.) pipeline.

That means there are at least 50 pipe joints for a tree to get its roots into your sewer pipes and helps explain why you can have multiple blockages in your pipes.

To excavate and repair or reline where the tree roots are getting in today doesn’t mean the tree roots won’t get in a little further downstream.

Vaporooter treats every joint in the pipeline.

Tree roots get in through the joints

Tree roots grow through pipe joints.

Tree roots usually enter your pipe line through the pipe joints.

Did you know each clay sewer pipe is usually 2-3 foot long? That’s 600-900mm each.

So, in a pipe line 100 feet in length (30 metres), there could be up to 50 individual pipes with bends and junctions.

That means there are at least 50 different places for tree roots to get into your sewer pipes.

That’s a lot of opportunity for tree roots searching for moisture in our hot Australian climate where rainfall is unpredictable.

If you’re considering pipe relining, root cutting or a pipe renewal as options for keeping the roots at bay, remember, the tree roots can just move down to the next pipe joint that hasn’t been protected.

How tree roots get into pipes #3


Tree roots grow into cracks in the joints of sewer pipes that may have been there even before the pipes were used.

Hard to believe but envisage this.

Your friendly plumber has dug a trench, laid the new earthenware pipes, cemented all the joints, then proceeded to back fill the trench.

The very process of backfilling the trench is enough to put pressure and fine cracks in the cement joints.

That is just enough to let the tree roots know that warm condensation is nearby.

When will you do my Vaporooter?

I just had a phone call from Deborah wanting to know when we are doing her annual Vaporooter treatment.

Deb said “You usually come at the end of October. You’ve been coming every year since 2010.”

“Oh, my pipes aren’t blocked but, I don’t want to go back to those days with horrible sewage overflowing and my toilet won’t flush” she said.

Deb has a large fig tree growing on the nature strip at the front of her home.

Don’t worry. We’ve got you covered Deborah

Apologies for the wind noise at the start of this 2.01 min clip.

How tree roots get into pipes #2

In my last post I described how tree roots can easily travel through soil that has been loosened by excavation to accommodate your pipe installation.

Do you know why tree roots grow in sewer pipes from the top of the pipe joints?

Condensation is formed when we run water from our water pipes, through our drains; especially when we have a hot shower, wash our clothes or dishes in hot or warm water.

When the warm water enters the drains buried in the cold earth, condensation is formed, and it gathers on the inside top of our sewer pipes and drains.

The tree roots moving through our already loosened soils can now move along the top of the pipelines and are attracted to the warmth and moisture inside. All they need now is a way into the pipe.

This 1.58sec clip shows how.

How tree roots get into pipes #1

Tree roots grow through trenches dug for plumbing pipes.

When plumbers excavate a trench in virgin soil to lay pipelines to take the waste water from your home, we till the soil.

That’s right, the simple method of excavating the soil with a shovel or even a mechanical excavator like a backhoe actually breaks up the soil.

After we complete our excavations and lay the pipes in the trenches, we back fill the trench, putting the excavated soils back.

Sometimes we water in the soil and quite often use a compactor to help with the back fill process.

Some pipe line excavations are back filled with an aggregate like blue metal gravel. Even so, the backfilled soil is never as compact as virgin soil. That provides the roots of nearby trees a much easier path to “wander” along in their search for water and nutrients.